Genealogy has become a hobby for me over the last 10 years. For me, it's like a puzzle, I love fitting the pieces together. But over the years, I've researched a lot that does not pertain to our family lines. Some for extended family, some for close friends, and some because I was trying to rule out lines to figure out where our line went exactly. I do not want these notes on my Heather's Genealogy Notes blog - because they are not our lines. But I do like to share all of my research, in case it benefits others. That is what this blog is for - research I have done that does not apply to our own family lines, but may be helpful for someone else.

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Jake Confare captured by Indians


 LOVE this story!

Jake Confare captured by Indians – from

THE
MICHAEL HILEMAN
MEMOIRS
1820 - 1915
Harold D. Hileman
On the 22nd of June, 1820, I was born in the log cabin which Grandfather Milligan had built when the country was almost a wilderness. I was the youngest of nine children. When grandparents established their residence in this three room log cabin, the Indians occasionally made raids on the settlement from their hunting grounds on the head waters of the Susquehanna River, beyond the Alleghenies. One of the worst of the raids of which Grandfather told me, was attended with the massacre of the HOWSER AND OLRAY families. Only two of the Howser families escaping the tomahawk and scalping knife, and these two were taken captive. They were very young children. They remained with the Potawatomies until forty years later, when the government in removing a tribe to the western reserve where what is now the state of Ohio, discovered JOACHIM AND RACHEL HOWSER who were now grown to middle age. Rachel was the wife of a Chief; Joachim, who had refused to marry a squaw, though he was made a chief by virtue of his bravery in the fight with the York State Indians in which the chief was killed by Joachim.

When told of the massacre of their parents and friends by the Potawatomies, when they were taken capture so long before, they were dazed and almost unable to comprehend the situation. However, their liberators prevailed upon them to return to their homeland, and scenes of their childhood, in the hope of that memory, when upon the scenes of their childhood, they would recall something to their minds of the time before the terrible time of their capture. Can we realize the feelings of these two unfortunate people as they were liberated from the Indians? Rachel being the mother of several papooses. Of course she was in the most trying of situation, for she had a mothers love for her children while they were plainly of Indian blood.

They returned to the beautiful and peaceful
Juniata valley amidst the splendid mammoth oaks, the shell bark hickory, the sycamore and the gigantic black walnuts. The swallows flitted over the stream, and the brownthirst sang in the midst of the bough just as they did forty years before, while this man and woman were barefoot children rollicking in their childish glee. In the presence of this scene much of it remained as it was in their childhood, but nothing was distinctly recalled to their memory, though they thought they could recall some glimpses of the past.

What a sad situation, the memories which might have heaved their bosom of motion, and pained their hearts, are not manifested in their beholding the scenes of their childhood. There remain in the neighborhood a few who will always remember the terrible ordeal, when these two were so cruelly taken from them; and these people tried to suggest things to their memory, but nature had almost sealed the past of that day to them. They remained but a little while until they returned to Potawatomies, to live and to die with them, far beyond the Alleghenies, in what is now the state of
Ohio.

Father said that several attempts had been made to find the captives but without success. The greatest attempt to do so was when a band of the strongest and the bravest of Huntingdon County ventured into the country of the Potawatomies at Cherry Tree, and while reconnoitering there one, of the strongest and the bravest of the party was suddenly surprised and taken captive by the very Indians whom they were hunting for.

Fortunate it was for JAKE CONFARE that he was so cool headed and brave. His companions soon discovered footprints in the forest and immediately decided that they were those of Jake's captures or slayers. They redoubled their efforts now to overtake them, if possible, but the wile red men escaped their pursuers without allowing themselves to be seen by the white men. They took their captive to their tribe on their hunting grounds in the pine groves of Kittatinny, and here JAKE awaited his fate or a chance to escape.

He lived with them for a year and a half without once events any desire to escape. But some traders came along with some ice skates, and they traded them to the Indians without the Indians having any idea how to use them, and Jake also pretended not to know. So one day while out wobbling about on his skates, he took a chance, and took off skating down the river. Obviously the Indians couldn't catch him, and so he made his escape.

The joy throughout the neighborhood was unbounded when the word was sent around of Jake's escape. The whole community had been in despair after the return of his companions without him. His account of his life while in captivity among the Potawatomie gave intense interest to young and old for many a day. At the time of the return of Rachel and Joachim, Jake Confare and Grandpa were old men. When the brother and his sister returned to the Indians to live the remainder of their lives, it was almost more than Jake and Grandfather could stand. They hated the Potawatomies, and in fact, all of the Indians so intensely.

 November, 1999 Copyright ©1999 by Harold D. Hileman

Permission to reprint the "The Memoirs of Michael Hileman Jr." is granted unless specifically stated otherwise, PROVIDED: (1) the reprint is used for non-commercial, educational purposes; and (2) a copy of this notice appears at the end of the reprint.


Saturday, October 27, 2012

William Shook 1834-1883

The Shook line is from my stepfather's family.  My husband is actually distantly related to this family -  William's youngest daughter Sarah Catherine Shook married Frank Zebedee Snyder.  Frank was the brother of Susan Bertha Snyder, Dan's great grandmother.  Susan married Benjamin Franklin Smith, they were the parents of Lloyd Smith, Dan's grandfather.

William Shook
Died May 23 1883
Married
Lydia Catherine Hurst
Daughter Of
Born 1840
Died 1898


Children
David Oliver Shook 1863 –1931  m. Sarah R. Kisner
Harvey Gideon Shook 1866 –  (never married)
Reuben H. Shook 1868 – 1900 m. Margaret Ann Frey
Samuel B. Shook 1870 –1949 m. Aida Idella Andrews
Jacob Shook 1873 – 1944 m. Laura May Jones
Emma May Shook 1875 –1951 m. Thomas Watts
Mary C. Shook 1877 –1911  m. Charles Carter
Lloyd Jesse Shook 1879 – 1973 m. Blanche Marr
Sarah Catherine Shook M. Frank Zebedee Snyder


Time Line:
1850  - William is home with his parents


1850 United States Federal Census about William Shook
Name: William Shook
Age: 16
Birth Year: abt 1834
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1850: Lewis, Northumberland, Pennsylvania
Gender: Male
Family Number: 45
Household Members:
Name Age
Jacob Shook 51
Mary Shook 40
Mary A Shook 20
William Shook 16
John Shook 13
Sarah Shook 11
Elizabeth Shook 8
Rebecca Shook 7
Henry Shook 3
Cathrine Shook 0

In 1850 the only close match I find for Lydia Catherine is in Columbia County - but the birth year is 4 years off - 

1850 United States Federal Census about Lydia C Hurst
Name: Lydia C Hurst
Age: 6
Birth Year: abt 1844
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1850: Madison, Columbia, Pennsylvania
Gender: Female
Family Number: 82
Household Members:
Name Age
Jos Hurst 28
Etty Hurst 29
Thos Hurst 8
Lydia C Hurst 6
Reuben Hurst 5

Hannah M Hurst 1

1860 - William still at home with his parents
1860 United States Federal Census about William Shook
Name: William Shook
Age in 1860: 24
Birth Year: abt 1836
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1860: Anthony, Montour, Pennsylvania
Gender: Male
Post Office: Exchange
Value of real estate: View image
Household Members:
Name Age
Jacob Shook 54
Mary Shook 50
William Shook 24
Sarah Shook 22
Elizabeth Shook 19
Rebecca Shook 15
Henry Shook 14
Catharine Shook 9

Sarah C Shook 2

Possible Match for Lydia Catherine?
1860 United States Federal Census about Cath Hurst
Name: Cath Hurst
Age in 1860: 20
Birth Year: abt 1840
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1860: Swatara, Dauphin, Pennsylvania
Gender: Female
Post Office: Harrisburg
Value of real estate: View image
Household Members:
Name Age
John Hurst 52
Elzabeth Hurst 45
Annie Hurst 22
Cath Hurst 20
Mary Hurst 26
Anna Hurst 22
Jacob Hurst 17
Ellen Hurst 16
Adeline Hurst 12
Fannie Hurst 30

David Longnecker

John & Elizabeth are buried in Columbia County Pa.  Columbia County borders Montour County, and the birth date for Catherine is correct.  I think this is the better lead for Catherine's parents.

1862, Abt - Married Lydia Catherine Hurst
William lived at home for the 1860 census, but their first child was born in 1863 - so they were married sometime between 1860 & 1863

1870
1870 United States Federal Census about William Shook
Name: William Shook
Age in 1870: 36
Birth Year: abt 1834
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1870: Turbot, Northumberland, Pennsylvania
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Milton
Value of real estate: View image
Household Members:
Name Age
William Shook 36
Lydia C Shook 26
David Shook 7
Harvey Shook 3
Reuben Shook 2

Samuel Shook 1/12

1880 United States Federal Census about William Shook
Name: William Shook
Age: 46
Birth Year: abt 1834
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1880: Anthony, Montour, Pennsylvania
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Catharine Shook
Father's Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Mother's Birthplace: Jermany
Neighbors: View others on page
Occupation: Farmer
Household Members:
Name Age
William Shook 46
Catharine Shook 37
David Shook 17
Harvy Shook 14
Ruben Shook 12
Samuel Shook 10
Jacob Shook 7
Emma Shook 5
Mary Shook 3
Lloid Shook 1

1883 - William Died

1898 - Catherine Died

Burial - Turbotville Cemetery, Turbotville Pa


Research:


Della Shook (Wife of Samuel, Daughter in law of William), Hazel Thomas, Agnes, Pearl Lambert, Blanche (Wife of Lloyd, daughter in law of William) Shook
(Photo From Mary Ellen Lewis)



Childrens Death Certificates:
Mary's (Mary C. Carter) Lists William Shook & Catherine Hurst as her parents
Thomas Watts Married Emma May Shook - making him the brother in law of Mary (Shook) Carter

Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1963 about E May Watts
Name: E May Watts
[E May Shook] 
Gender: Female
Race: White
Age: 76
Birth Date: 13 Feb 1875
Birth Place: Montour County, Pennsylvania
Death Date: 15 Jul 1951
Death Place: Norristown, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, USA
Father Name: William Shook
Mother Name: Lydia Catherine Hurst

Certificate Number: 62668

Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1963 about Samuel B Shook
Name: Samuel B Shook
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 78
Birth Date: 24 May 1870
Birth Place: McChensville, Pennsylvania
Death Date: 10 Mar 1949
Death Place: Muncy Creek, Lycoming, Pennsylvania, USA
Father Name: William Shook
Father Birth Place: Pennsylvania
Mother Name: Catherine Hurst
Mother Birth Place: Pennsylvania
Spouse Name: Ada Idella Andrews

Certificate Number: 23991

Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1963 about Harvey Shook
Name: Harvey Shook
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 74
Birth Date: 10 Aug 1866
Birth Place: Montour County, Pennsylvania
Death Date: 18 Apr 1941
Death Place: Muncy, Lycoming, Pennsylvania, USA
Father Name: William Shook
Father Birth Place: Pennsylvania
Mother Name: Katherine Hurst
Mother Birth Place: Pennsylvania

Certificate Number: 39931

Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1963 about David A Shook
Name: David A Shook
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 68
Birth Date: 20 Mar 1863
Birth Place: Pennsylvania Montour County
Death Date: 25 Oct 1931
Death Place: Williamsport, Lycoming, Pennsylvania, USA
Father Name: William Shook
Father Birth Place: Pennsylvania
Mother Name: Sarah Hurst
Mother Birth Place: Pennsylvania

Certificate Number: 97411

(David Died in an Auto Accident)

Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1963 about Sarah Catherina Snyder
Name: Sarah Catherina Snyder
[Sarah Catherina Shook] 
Gender: Female
Race: White
Age: 79
Birth Date: 7 Sep 1881
Birth Place: Anthony Township, Montour County, Pennsylvania
Death Date: 24 Jul 1961
Death Place: Lewis, Northumberland, Pennsylvania, USA
Father Name: William Shook
Mother Name: Catherine Hurst
Spouse Name: Frank Z Snyder

Certificate Number: 067120-61

Reuben Shook 1868 - 1900


Reuben Shook
son of William & Lydia Shook
Born 1868 
Died 1900
Married
Margaret Anne Frey
Born 1871 
Died 1947


   



1870 United States Federal Census about Reuben Shook
Name: Reuben Shook
Age in 1870: 2
Birth Year: abt 1868
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1870: Turbot, Northumberland, Pennsylvania
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Milton
Value of real estate: View image
Household Members:
Name Age
William Shook 36
Lydia C Shook 26
David Shook 7
Harvey Shook 3
Reuben Shook 2
Samuel Shook 1/12

1880 United States Federal Census about Ruben Shook
Name: Ruben Shook
Age: 12
Birth Year: abt 1868
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1880: Anthony, Montour, Pennsylvania
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Son
Marital Status: Single
Father's Name: William Shook
Father's Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Mother's name: Catharine Shook
Mother's Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
William Shook 46
Catharine Shook 37
David Shook 17
Harvy Shook 14
Ruben Shook 12
Samuel Shook 10
Jacob Shook 7
Emma Shook 5
Mary Shook 3
Lloid Shook 1

William Walter Shook 1896-1951

Mary Ellen Shook, Lester Lewis, William Walter Shook
Doris Jane Shook

William Walter Shook
Born 1896 
Died  1951
Married
Mary Catherine Schmoel
Born 1899 
Died 1967

Children:
Doris Jane




1940 United States Federal Census about William W Shook
Name: William W Shook
Age: 43
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1897
Gender: Male
Race: White
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Marital Status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Head
Home in 1940: Muncy, Lycoming, Pennsylvania
View Map
Street: West Penn Street
House Number: 217
Farm: No
Inferred Residence in 1935: Muncy, Lycoming, Pennsylvania
Residence in 1935: Same House
Sheet Number: 9B
Number of Household in Order of Visitation: 216
Occupation: Salesman
House Owned or Rented: Owned
Value of Home or Monthly Rental if Rented: 5000
Attended School or College: No
Highest Grade Completed: High School, 4th year
Hours Worked Week Prior to Census: 60
Class of Worker: Working on own account
Weeks Worked in 1939: 52
Income: 3000
Income Other Sources: No
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
William W Shook 43
Mary C Shook 41
Mary Ellen Shook 12
Dora Jane Shook 8






     Billy & Mary Shook
John Lewis
   Anna Mae Lambert
Mary Ellen
     Hazel Thomas
Lester Lewis
     Hazel Lambert




William Shook
Mary Shook
Pearl Lambert

Doris Shook
Mary Ellen Shook
Billy Lambert


 Bill Shook
Lester Thomas
Carl & Madeline Thomas
Mary Shook
Myrtle Thomas
Russell Lewis
Mary Ellen (hidden)
Ann Marie
Susie Thomas with
Elaine in front of her
Dace and Fred Thomas



Bill Shook
Carl & Madeline Thomas
Mary Shook
Russell Lewis
Doris
Myrtle Thomas
SusieThomas
Mary Ellen (hidden)
Ann Marie (Sister Henry)
Susie Thomas with
Elaine in front of her
Dace and Fred Thomas


Henry B Iddings



Henry B. Iddings
son of Richard & Margaret Lloyd (Charles) Iddings
Birth 1727 in Chester, PA, USA
Death 21 Nov 1819
Married 23 March 1752
Mary Wynne
daughter of
Birth
Death


Children:


 Henry Iddings was born in 1727 at Nantmeal, Chester County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of William Iddings and Mary Moore. Henry Iddings married Mary Wynne on 23 March 1752 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. Henry Iddings died on 21 November 1819 at Union County, Pennsylvania.

Henry Iddings ,and all his sons, fought in the Revolutionary War while their Quaker cousins did not actively fight the supported the American cause. On July 27, 1787 Henry was awarded 400 acres in Chester County, PA and an additional 20 acres on May 12,1797.

1790 United States Federal Census about Henry Iddings
Name: Henry Iddings
Home in 1790 (City, County, State): Northumberland, Pennsylvania
Free White Persons - Males - 16 and over: 4
Free White Persons - Females: 2
Number of Household Members: 6

Family Data Collection - Individual Records about Henry Iddings
Name: Henry Iddings
Spouse: Iddings Mary
Parents: Moore William Mary
Birth Place: Chester, Nantmeal, PA
Birth Date: 1727
Marriage Date: 23 Mar 1752
Death Date: 21 Nov 1819

Conrad Kress 1762-1844

Conrad Kress
son of
Born 1872 in Hunterdon, NJ
Died Oct 24 1844 Lycoming County, PA
married 12 May 1789
Mary Iddings
Daughter of  Henry B  & Mary (Wynne) Iddings
Born 09 Sep 1791, Union, PA
Died

Children

Anna Maria Kress.
Elizabeth Kress
George B Kress, b. 1799, Northumberland, PA, USA48, d. 25 Mar 1873
Catherine E Kress, b. 1802, Anthony, Lycoming, PA, USA48, d. 1880,  Lycoming, PA,
Lydia Kress Kriss, b. 09 Sep 1791, Union, PA, USA48, d. 17 Jun 1877, Lycoming, PA, 







Pennsylvania Pensioners, 1835 about Conrad Kriss
Information: County: Lycoming Co.
Name: Conrad Kriss
Rank: Private
Annual Allowance: 80 00
Sums Received: 240 00
Description of service: Pennsylvania militia
When placed on the pension roll: September 13, 1833
Commencement of pension: March 4, 1831
Age: 72
Laws under which inscribed, increased or reduced OR Remarks.: -

American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) about Conrad Kress
Name: Conrad Kress
Birth Date: 17620
Birthplace: Pennsylvania,
Volume: 98
Page Number: 388
Biographical Info: Rev.War
Reference: Census of pensioners for Rev. military serivces. Washington, DC. 1841. (195p.):123

U.S. Pensioners, 1818-1872 about Conrad Kriss
Name: Conrad Kriss
Widow's Name: Mary Kriss
Pension Office City/Town: Philadelphia
Pension Office State: Pennsylvania
Year Range: 1835-1850

1840 United States Federal Census about Conrad Kress
Name: Conrad Kress
Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Lycoming, Lycoming, Pennsylvania
Birth Year: abt 1761
Age: 79
Military Service: Veteran

Martin Tschudy -1836



Martin Tschudy
Son of Rudolf Tschudy
Birth:  Dec. 22, 1744
Death:  Jun. 2, 1836

Married 9 Sep 1777
Anna Barbara Adams
daughter of
Born 1753
Died 1816



Children:


Margaret (Margaretha) Tschudy Spies (1788 - 1869)*
John Jacob (1778 - 1834)
Martin (1780 - _)
Barbara (1783 - 1791) Died at Age 7
Anna (1792 - Aft 1822)
Barbara (1798 - _)




Aged 93 yrs & 6 mo / American Revolutionary War Vet

Martin was born in Schwanden, in the Canton Glarus in Switzerland. He lived in Pennsylvania and held the rank of Corporal after enlisting in June of 1776 in the Revolutionary War. He was at the battles of Trenton, Princeton and New Brunswick. He was discharged in Philadelphia in January of 1777. He moved to Baltimore, Md. His grandson, Baltis Kennard wrote of him, "The latter years of his life he spent as a Horticulturist and Florist. His garden was on W. Market St. extended, ... He came of Sturdy Stock, possessed genius, was a musician and made many curious instruments of his own design, which produced music of a sweet and novel tone of character." This is NOT the Martin Tschudy of Dickeyville, Md.


Inscription:
Grandfather Martin Tschudy Died June 2, 1836 Aged 93 yrs 6 mos

Note: He shares a stone with his son-in-law and grandson 

Burial:
Loudon Park Cemetery 
Baltimore
Baltimore City
Maryland, USA
Plot: KK-14



A Mapmaker in Schwanden, Switzerland
According to info. in an email to B.J. Peters, Thomas Schatti, founder of the Schwanden Historical Society in Schwanden, Canton Glarus, Switzerland - Martin Tschudi was the first to leave Schwanden for America. He left his widowed father, Rudolf and family behind. A new chapter was beginning in the life of Martin as he left his homeland in 1772 where he had been employed as a Map Maker.

Sailed To America  in 1772
"19th of October, 1772..... The Foreigners whose Names are hereunder written, imported in the ship Catherine, [James] Sutton, Master, from Rotterdam but last from London, did this day take the foregoing Oaths & Qualifications in the usual Form .... Mardin (X) Schude ."
Source:Ralph Beaver Strassburger, ed. William John Hinkle, Pennsylvania German Pioneers, A Publication of the Original Lists of Arrivals in the Port of Philadelphia from 1727 to 1808. Volune I, 1727-1775., (Pennsylvania German Society, Norristown, PA 1934), 742, " [List 297C] 


Fought in the Revolutionary War
He held the rank of Corporal and fought for Pennsylvania in the Revolutionary War.
In June of 1776 Martin enlisted to serve in the Revolutionary War. He was discharged in January of 1777 in Philadelphia. On 9 Sep 1777 he married Anna Barbara Adams in Philadelphia at the German Reformed Church. On that same morning, Washington's troops were being positioned along the Brandywine River to prevent an advance toward Philadelphia by the British. On September 11 the American forces were defeated at the Battle of Brandywine [seehttp://www.ushistory.org/brandywine/thestory.htm ], and the Continental Congress abandoned the city, moving the Capitol west. Before doing so, they called for the Liberty Bell, the bell that hung at the State House [now called Independence Hall], and bells from the surrounding churches to be moved out of the city to prevent the British from melting them down for ammunition.


According to the Zion's United Church of Christ's website, a train of 700 wagons, accompanied by 200 cavalrymen, left Philadelphia carrying the bells and military supplies. They were taking the bells to Allentown for safety. The Rev. Abraham Blumer, mentioned above, kept the Liberty Bell safe. He hid it under the floorboards of his church. 




Deposition of Martin Cronmiller Re: Martin Tschudi's Service in Continental Army 1776-77
31Dec1834 , Union County, Pennsylvania
                                      State of Pennsylvania                                          Union County
Personally appeared before me Henry Yearick one of the Justices of the Peace in and for said County Martin Cronmiller, of the Township of West ________ in the County and State aforesaid who being sworn according to Law doth depose and say, that he was well acquainted with Martin Tschudy now of the City of Baltimore in the state of Maryland, but has not seen him for about forty years. That Deponent and the said Tschudy served together in the Revolutionary War but at this distant period is unable to state the precise month of the year that the said Tschudy or himself entered the service. That he knows that it was in the year 1776 and that both of them served for six Months. That the Body of Troops to which they were attached was called the Flying Camp. That the deponent belonged to the Regiment commanded by Colonel Swope. That the Company to which he belonged was commanded by Captain Starkes. That Major Bailey was attached to the said Regiment. That he is unable to say positively to what Regiment said Tschudy belonged as the Brigade consisted of several Body of Troops but he is certain that said Martin Tschudy served in what was called the "Flying Camp" and that he did serve for six months and that he conducted himself in a soldierlike manner during the whole of his service. That they are both now very old men. That he deponent is in the Seventy fourth year of his age. That he cannot recollect the particular of their service but recollects that the service was principally performed in the state of New Jersey in a subsequent year which Deponent cannot remember said Tschudy served in a company with him in guarding prisoners taken by the American Army at Trenton.
That said Tschudy and Deponent at that time talked over the occurrances of their former service. That said service of guarding prisoners was performed about four miles below York Pennsylvania where Deponent knows said Tschudy served for and during two months_ Their Captain was Peter (Ford?) their Majors name was Bailey said Tschudy conducted himself well. Further this Deponent saith not except that he believes that the said Martin Tschudy acted as a corporal during the whole time of his first service.    Martin Cronmiller
I do hereby certify that the aforegoing Deposition was sworn and subscribed to before me and that the said Martin Cronmiller the deponent is well known to me and that he is a man of worth and veracity.    Given under my hand and seal this thirty first day of December Eighteen hundred and thirty four.   (This was signed by H Yearick, Justice of the Peace)
 bjriversadded this on 22 Sep 2007
This testimony was gathered to support Martin Tschudi's claim to a pension as a veteran of the American Revolutionary War.



Married Anna Barbara Adams
 On 9 Sep 1777 he married Anna Barbara Adams in Philadelphia at the German Reformed Church.

Children:
According to the church register of the Frederick (Md) Reformed Church, record was made of the death of Martin and Barbara's 7 yr. old daugh. Barbara, who died on 31 Mar 1791. They were evidently members of that church, and living in Frederick, Md. at the time. [BJ's Note: They did have a second dau. they named Barbara who was b. in 1798 d?] Source: Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin, Vol. 22, No. 4, Fall 1981, Reformed Church, Frederick, Page 271 .


Census

1820 census
Name: Martin Tschudy
Home in 1820 (City, County, State): District 1, Baltimore, Maryland
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Free White Persons - Males - 26 thru 44: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 16 thru 25: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 26 thru 44: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 45 and over : 1
Slaves - Males - 14 thru 25: 2
Slaves - Females - 14 thru 25: 1
Number of Persons - Engaged in Agriculture: 3
Number of Persons - Engaged in Manufactures: 1
Free White Persons - Over 25: 3
Total Free White Persons: 5
Total Slaves: 3
Total All Persons - White, Slaves, Colored, Other:

1834 Sells Land to his daughter:


Martin Tschudi Sells Land to His Daugh Margaret Spies
11 Jul 1834 , Baltimore, Md.
Helen Beall (who has since passed on) provided this document to BJ Peters and proof read BJ's transcription. Received 8 Jan 2003 by BJ  This Indenture made this 18th day of March 1834 between Martin Tschudy of the City of Baltimore and State of Maryland of the one part and Margarett Spies of the same city aforesaid of the other part Witnesseth the said Martin Tschudy for and in consideration the sum of five dollars in hand paid by the said Margaret Spies at and before the sealing and delivery of these presents the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged hath given granted bargained sold assigned transferred and set over and by these presents doth give grant bargain sell assign transfer and set over unto the said Margarett Spies her heirs executors   administrators and assigns all the following lot of ground situate and lying near Baltimore Town (now in the City of Baltimore) contained within the metes bounds courses and distances to wit Beginning for the same from the south west corner of Mansel Alcocks lot running thence west binding on Market Street thirty feet thence north to John Martins ground about eight hundred feet more or less thence east parallel with Market Street thirty feet thence south with a Straight line to the beginning together with the premises thereon being and all and every the appurtenances and advantages thereunto belonging and all the estate right title and interest term of years property claim and demand whatsoever of him the said Martin TschudyTo Have and To Hold the said lot of ground with the appurtenances and advantages thereunto belonging unto the said Margarett Spies her heirs executors administrators and assigns for and during the term of ninety nine years in as  full large ample and beneficial manner to all intents and purposes whatsoever as he the said Martin Tschudy might should could or ought to have held and enjoyed the same by any ways or means whatsoever and the said Martin Tschudy for himself his heirs executors administrators and assigns doth covent promise grant and agree to and with the said Margarett Spies her heirs executors administrators and assigns that upon the said Margaret Spies her heirs executors administrators and assigns paying the rent or sum of Eleven pounds five shillings current money yearly and every year on the first day of May in each year clear of all taxes and assessments  whatsoever shall and may at all times hereafter peaceably and quietly have hold use occupy possess and enjoy the aforesaid lott of ground and premises without the let suit trouble molestation or hindrance of him the said Martin Tschudy or his heirs or any other person or persons whatsoever lawfully claiming or to claim anything therein or thereto by from or under  him them or any of them and further that she the said Margaret Spies her heirs executors administrators and assigns on paying the sum of eleven pounds five shillings current money as a fine therefor at any time or times hereafter shall have renewment of the  above assigned lot of ground and premises in manner and form and under the same rents as are herein mentioned so that this assignment shall be renewed and renewable forever and further that she the said Margaret Spies her heirs administrators and assigns shall at any time hereafter have the power of buying out the said lot of ground free from all rents incumbrances or any demands  that shall hereafter be made thereon at the rate of six per cent In witness whereof the said Martin Tschudy hereunto set his hand and affixed his seal this day and year first above written.Signed Sealed and delivered in the presence of Wm. Ashman   Joseph Shaw Beneath Martin's first signature reads Received on the 18th day of April 1834 of Margaret Spies the sum of five dollars being the consideration within mentioned to be by her paid to me $5.00 Witness Wm. Ashman Joseph Shaw Martin's signature follows. Baltimore City to wit on this 18th day of April 1834 before us two Justices of the peace in and for the City aforesaid appeared Martin Tschudy and acknowledged the foregoing and within instrument of writing to be his act and deed according to the true intent and meaning thereof and we further certify and declare that the said Martin Tschudy now executing this paper by satisfactory testimony connected  with our own knowledge is the same person named in the foregoing instrument of writing. Wm. Ashman   Joseph Shaw. Received to be recorded the 11th day of July 1834 at 10 minutes after 11 oclock A.M. same day recorded and examined W. Thos Kell Clk



Letters written by Martin:

CORRESPONDENCE: A gentleman named Edward Quinter has been kind enough to share what he discovers in his research. On 20 Nov 1798 Martin wrote a letter to his cousin, Rev. Abraham Blumer (mentioned above) One of the things he mentions is Napolean's forces attacking Switzerland. 
Valued friend and cousin -
I take this opportunity to inform you that I and my loved ones continue in good health, thanks be to God. I also hope the same for you. This past summer I received the two letters from Mister Muller. He gave them to me in person. But the one that you sent to Mister Riegel in Frederick [?MD], I didn't see. My son, Jacob was at Riegel's , who said he didn't recall to whom he gave the letter. Please tell me if you hear any news. Or if you happen to be writing to Glarus soon, so please let everyone know we're getting on well, and are living in Baltimore in the province of Maryland. Two months ago I sent a letter with Bremer.
Young Mr. Bund[?] was here among us. He preached in all 3 churches. I asked him about the activities of his father and also of Mr. Pflaumer[?]. He told me that ____ both are still well. That was really good to hear. In the newspapers comes the troubling news from Switzerland, that evidently the French have invaded our homeland. I heard that the Glarner defended themselves well, so too the folk from Wallis and Bern. Other cantons, however, did nothing.
Baltimore in Maryland
20th Nov. 1798
your loyal friend,
Martin Tschudi


Esteemed Friend and Cousin:-
On the 28th of August I received your letter, in which I learned of the terrible circumstances in Switzerland, because they haven't ascertained the whereabouts of the merchant, whose name is Johannes Beles or Beher, because the name isn't correct, and also because of the sickness. The resident was from the city. But since receiving the last letter, I was able to find the correct name as Johann Bahn and retrieve the gold. Since I didn't know the exact sum of money or how much, he gave Master Frey $404.00. I would now request letting me know if you received that money or not, and how much that was in Gulden. Thank God the illness has receded.
At this time I don't wish to speak of an inheritance. I hope soon there will be peace. [Illegible text] I would have gone this fall, but was sick, and hope to go should there be peace still in my lifetime. I saw my cousin David Schriff a short time ago. He lives in Adams [illegible text] on the [not clear - Cider?] Creek about 8 miles from Master Frey.
I close for now with a hearty greeting and the wish for you and yours, that the Lord watch over you.
I remain your loyal friend,
Martin Tschudi

Baltimore, Maryland December 10th


An 1802 letter written by a Schindler cousin of Rev. Blumer. The letter to Blumer mentions Anna Goldi, a maid for the Tschudi family in Switzerland, who was tried as a witch, and the last accused of that crime, and executed for it in Europe. Her execution took place in 1782. Schindler mentions that Martin returned to visit the family in Switzerland around Christmas of 1801 and would be heading back to America after Easter of 1802. This confirms the information in the Schwanden family tree in the Landesarchiv about Martin's visit.

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Martin's grandson, Baltis H. Kennard, 2nd great grandfather of B.J. Rivers Peters, wrote the following about Martin: "Margaret Spies the Mother of Louisa Kennard was a Tschudy of Swiss origin. One brother, John Jacob, was a bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church and for awhile had charge of a church in South Carolina. Her father Martin Tschudy was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. He lived to the age of 93 years. The writer remembers him well. He died about 1835 or 36. The writer was then a child. He came of Sturdy Stock, possessed genius, was a musician and made many curious instruments of his own design, which produced music of a sweet and novel tone of character. 

The latter years of his life he spent as a Horticulturist and Florist. His garden was on W. Market St. extended, nearly opposite where the Winans' estate now stands - now Baltimore Street. He occupied a large tract, but narrow in dimensions, and which it is said, extended N. easterly to considerable extent. Latterly the larger share of this land went into other hands, and a lengthy strip, it is said went to other possession, without proper title, but these theories are so common to future generations that they become. Little less than a phantom and even, had they an embodiment, lapse of time renders a recovery essentially impossible. Mr. Tschudy, however, died possessed of that portion which fronted on the north side of Baltimore Street and extended to an openway then called Park Lane, now Raborg Street. [Note of Lorelle Parott Weidlein states that this street is now Fairmount] This property he gave to his daughter Margaret - Mrs. Spies then a widow, who nursed him and admin!
istered to his comfort in his decreasing years. It will not be uninteresting to note, that Margaret Spies created annuities out of this land, and in subsequent years, sold them and invested the proceeds, in a lot at the S. West corner of Pennsylvania avenue and Biddle Street, created thereout, an annuity of $100.00. "