Genealogy has become a hobby for me over the last 10 years. For me, it's like a puzzle, I love fitting the pieces together. But over the years, I've researched a lot that does not pertain to our family lines. Some for extended family, some for close friends, and some because I was trying to rule out lines to figure out where our line went exactly. I do not want these notes on my Heather's Genealogy Notes blog - because they are not our lines. But I do like to share all of my research, in case it benefits others. That is what this blog is for - research I have done that does not apply to our own family lines, but may be helpful for someone else.

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Elias Mook 1788-1893

Elias Mook
Son of Henry & Sarah Mook
Born 1820
Died 28 February 1893
Married
Elizabeth Lytle
Daughter of Samuel & Catherine (Marshall) Lytle
Born  Oct 12 1830
Died March 5 1914

Children:
Sarah Catherine Mook 1854 – 1938
Rachel R. Mook 1860 – 1948
Susanna Mook 1862 – 1941
Caroline Mook 1864 – 1936
Elizabeth M. Mook 1866 – 1959
John G Mook 1867 – 1947
Samuel A Mook 1869 – 1942
Henry A. Mook 1872 – 
Elias E. Mook 1876 – 1958
Fanny Mook 1878 – 1963
Daniel Mook 1880 – 1966

1880 United States Federal Census about Elias Mook
Name: Elias Mook
Age: 60
Birth Year: abt 1820
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1880: West Buffalo, Union, Pennsylvania
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Elizabeth Mook
Father's Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Mother's Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Neighbors: View others on page
Occupation: Laborer
Cannot read/write:

Household Members:
Name Age
Elias Mook 60
Elizabeth Mook 50
Rachel R. Mook 20
Susanna Mook 18
Caroline Mook 16
Elizabeth M. Mook 14
John G. Mook 13
Samuel A. Mook 10
Henry A. Mook 7
Elias E. Mook 3
Fanny Mook 1
Catharine Leitle 90

Death - 






Research:


John Mook 1867-1947


John Mook
son of Elias & Elizabeth (Lytle) Mook
Born October 4 1867
Died June 19 1947
Married 1st
Sarah Jane Aikey
Born May 1871
Died 1939
Married 2nd
daughter of
Born
Died



Time Line:

1867 - Born
4 Oct 1867 in West Buffalo Township, Union County, PA

1880
Age: 13
West Buffalo, Union, Pennsylvania, United States
Age: 13; Marital Status: Single; Relation to Head of House: Son

1892 Marriage to Sarah Jane Aikey
18 Dec 1892
Age: 25
Forest Hill Union Co. Pa.


1900
Age: 33
Residence - Buffalo Township, District 1, Union, Pennsylvania

1910
Age: 43
Residence - West Buffalo, Union, Pennsylvania
Age: 42

1920
Age: 53
Residence - Buffalo, Union, Pennsylvania


1930
Age: 63
Residence - West Buffalo, Union, Pennsylvania

1935
Age: 68
Residence - West Buffalo, Union, Pennsylvania

Mary (Oberdorf) Aikey's husband Paul Aikey commits suicide


1939 - Wife Sarah Died


1940 - Marriage to Mary Alice Oberdorf
29 Feb 1940
Age: 72
Union County, Pennsylvania


1940
1 Apr
Age: 72
Residence - West Buffalo, Union, Pennsylvania, United States
Age: 72; Marital Status: Married; Relation to Head of House: Head

1947- Death
 June 19 1947 in West Buffalo, Union County Pa



Research:


All of my Mook Scans are here:



James Henry Gregson 1822-1899

James Henry Gregson was brother to Mary (Gregson) Smith, 
making him Heather's 4th great uncle


James Henry Gregson
Born September 14, 1822
Died August 1 1899
Married
Eliza Jane Marshall
Daughter of John & Ann (Hughes) Marshall
Born 1824
Died 1889

Children:
Ann 1846- m. Robert Reid
Mary Ellen 1848-
William F 1850-
John N 1852-
Eliza Jane 1854-
Henry M 1856-
Adelia 1858 - 
Caroline 1862
Luke 1868

"Annie, the first white child born in Sutter's Fort, as above. She is
now Mrs. Reid of San Luis Obispo county, this State; Mary Ellen born at Coloma,
September 25, 1848, now Mrs. McChristian; William F., a resident of Stanislaus
county, California, born September 24, 1850; John N., born September 1, 1852,
and resides in San Luis Obispo county; Eliza Jane, now Mrs. Butler, of Mark
West, born May 31, 1854; Henry M., born October 5, 1856; Adelia J., born March
28, 1858, now Mrs. George Fraits, of San Luis Obispo county ; Caroline, born
October 29, 1862, and Luke B., born March 27, 1868. "- History of Sonoma County

"Eliza Marshall Gregson (b. 1824), a millworker, and James Gregson (b. 1822), a blacksmith, were natives of England who married in Rhode Island in 1843 and almost immediately schemed to escape to the West. In 1845 they set out for Oregon, eventually joining a California party. Johann Sutter aided them, and the Gregsons lived at his fort until 1847. James Gregson enlisted in the U.S. Army under Frémont in 1846 and prospected for gold in 1848 and 1849 while his wife bore and raised their children and took in washing and sewed to support the family. In 1850, the family settled down on a ranch in Sonoma County. The Gregson memoirs (1940) prints James Gregson's brief "Statement" of the facts of his life and his wife's longer "Memory" of her experiences as a wife, mother, and businesswoman in  pioneer California."


Time Line:

1822 - Born
James Gregson was born in Little Bolton, Lancashire, England, on September 14, 1822.  Hist. of Sonoma County , p. 474.






1834 - Came To America

"I was born in England and came as a boy of twelve years to Philadelphia"
October 1834 emmigated to america with his parents

1837 - bound as an apprentice

In 1837, in Philadelphia, he was bound to James Brooks as an apprentice to the blacksmiths' and machinists' trade and served until he was 21 years old. Hist. of Sonoma County , p. 474.

1843 - Married Eliza Jane Marshall

"Here, on October 20, 1843, he married Miss Eliza
Marshall, who was born in the city of Manchester, England, on March 15, 1824"  - History of Sonoma County

finished his apprenticeship before the wedding


Moved to Philadelphia & lived with his parents.



1844 - Headed West
May 1844 - left for Illinois

"I was born in England and came as a boy of twelve years to Philadelphia and went to Illinois in the spring of 1844 and with my wife joined a train for Oregon at Independence in [April] 1845, and at Fort Hall we determined to come to California. There we met Greenwood, the mountaineer, who told us we could get land of the grant holders and agreed to fetch us in. He got $2.50 .......... apiece to pilot us in to California. There was in our train about thirty wagons and perhaps--persons including men, women and children. Near Fort Hall we fell in with Jacob R. Snyder and Judge Blackburn who were travelling with pack horses. They came on with us. With our party came George McDougal,  a young man. He was brave and handsome. He joined us at Fort Hall, and also Knight from whom Knights Valley is named. The Elliotts  were along, and John Grigsby, and the McChristians and family, and the Hudson family. We had no trouble at all at the sink of the Humboldt [except that we] had a few shots fired into our cattle. Ide, who issued the proclamation at Sonoma,  was also along. He was a prominent man; he was well provided."


1846 - daughter born, first white child in Sacramento Valley

"I have a daughter who is now Mrs. Robert Reid of San Luis Obispo, who was born at Sutter's Fort, September 15, 1846. She was the first white child born in the Sacramento Valley."




1849 - Returned to Sonoma

"We left with eight hundred dollars and came back to Sonoma in the fall of 1849 and have been here ever since. I bought land of Captain Cooper."

1850

1850 United States Federal Census about James Gregson
Name: James Gregson
Age: 27
Birth Year: abt 1823
Birthplace: England
Home in 1850: Sonoma, California
Gender: Male
Family Number: 31
Household Members:
Name Age
James Gregson 27
Eliza Gregson 26
Ann Gregson 4

Mary E Gregson 2

1860

1860 United States Federal Census about James Gregson
Name: James Gregson
Age in 1860: 36
Birth Year: abt 1824
Birthplace: England
Home in 1860: Annally, Sonoma, California
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: View image
Household Members:
Name Age
James Gregson 36
Elija Gregson 25
Anna E Gregson 13
Mary E Gregson 12
William Gregson 10
John Gregson 8
Elija Gregson 6
Henry Gregson 7

Adelia Gregson 2


1870 United States Federal Census about Janes Gregson
Name: Janes Gregson
[James Gregson] 
Age in 1870: 47
Birth Year: abt 1823
Birthplace: England
Home in 1870: Analy, Sonoma, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Sebastopol
Value of real estate: View image
Household Members:
Name Age
Janes Gregson 47
Eliza Gregson 46
Mary E Gregson 22
Wm F Gregson 20
John N Gregson 18
Eliza Gregson 16
Henry N Gregson 13
Adelia Gregson 11
Caroline Gregson 7
Luke L Gregson 2



1880 United States Federal Census about James Gregson
Name: James Gregson
Age: 57
Birth Year: abt 1823
Birthplace: England
Home in 1880: Analy, Sonoma, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Eliza Gregson
Father's Birthplace: England
Mother's Birthplace: England
Neighbors: View others on page
Occupation: Farmer
Cannot read/write:
View image
Household Members:
Name Age
James Gregson 57
Eliza Gregson 50
John Gregson 27
Henry Gregson 23
Caroline Gregson 17
Luke B. Gregson 12

1881 - James Visits the Newspaper and chats - 


Petaluma Weekly Argus 
(Petaluma, California)

04 Mar 1881, Fri  • Page 3

1894 - Visits Charles Romer
The Petaluma Courier 
(Petaluma, California)
08 Aug 1894, Wed  • Page 7

1899 - James Optimistic About Fruit Crop


Petaluma Daily Morning Courier 
(Petaluma, California)
01 Apr 1898, Fri  • Page 2


1899 - James Gregson Died
The San Francisco Call 
(San Francisco, California)
02 Aug 1899, Wed  • Page 2

Ukiah Daily Journal 
(Ukiah, California)
04 Aug 1899, Fri  • Page 3



Petaluma Daily Morning Courier 
(Petaluma, California)
02 Aug 1899, Wed  • Page 2





Research:

Statement of John Henry Gregson:


I was born in England and came as a boy of twelve years to Philadelphia and went to Illinois in the spring of 1844 and with my wife joined a train for Oregon at Independence in [April] 1845, and at Fort Hall we determined to come to California. There we met Greenwood, the mountaineer, who told us we could get land of the grant holders and agreed to fetch us in. He got $2.50 .......... apiece to pilot us in to California. There was in our train about thirty wagons and perhaps--persons including men, women and children. Near Fort Hall we fell in with Jacob R. Snyder and Judge Blackburn who were travelling with pack horses. They came on with us. With our party came George McDougal,  a young man. He was brave and handsome. He joined us at Fort Hall, and also Knight from whom Knights Valley is named. The Elliotts  were along, and John Grigsby, and the McChristians and family, and the Hudson family. We had no trouble at all at the sink of the Humboldt [except that we] had a few shots fired into our cattle. Ide, who issued the proclamation at Sonoma,  was also along. He was a prominent man; he was well provided.
Note:
James Gregson was born in Little Bolton, Lancashire, England, on September 14, 1822. In 1837, in Philadelphia, he was bound to James Brooks as an apprentice to the blacksmiths' and machinists' trade and served until he was 21 years old. Hist. of Sonoma County , p. 474.
We got into the Sacramento Valley the last of October, and went to Sutter's Fort, and there I was employed as a whipsawyer with Henry Marshall who came out with us. The lumber was to build a schooner on the headwaters of the Cosumnes River, fifty miles from the Fort. We cut a good deal of lumber. While there an Indian came in who had never seen a white man; he had a hat made like their baskets and all covered with feathers. I traded him a white shirt for it, and afterwards traded it to a Mormon for a horse. We went in to the Fort in the fall of 1845. Captain Sutter sent for us, and the lumber got to the Fort a few days before Christmas. He gave us $30 a thousand for lumber payable in goods.
We then entered into a contract with Mr. Hardy who owned a great estate at the mouth of the Feather River where the town of Sacramento was. We stayed with him three months, doing general farm work and living in a tule shanty. I only stayed there three months and then went back to Sutter's Fort. Hardy fell off of a schooner in Suisun Bay and was drowned. 
I went to work digging a ditch for Captain Sutter with Henry Marshall, at $2.50 a rod, a foot wide at the top and four feet deep, and two feet at the bottom.  We worked at this Fort until the war began. When we first came in we heard that Sutter was favorable to the Americans. Then I went to work for the Captain at anything he wanted. Soon after we got in, a proclamation was read notifying the Americans to leave. After it was read Sutter told us to stand by him and he would stand by us.
Fremont came to the Fort in February 1846. In the fight with the Klamath Indians Captain Gillespie killed an Indian with a coat of mail made of wood slats and a warp of sinew. I saw the coat of mail when it was shewn to Captain Sutter on his return. Captain Gillespie afterwards commanded sixty men as volunteers.
I was at Sutter's Fort when Vallejo and the Bear Flag prisoners [were there and] took my regular turn as a guard of the prisoners. I had been enlisted into the services of the United States for three months at $12 per month. [When I] guarded the men they all appeared quiet. We used to take them out to exercise--Bob Ridley, J. P. Leese, Victor Prudon, Salvador and General Vallejo--then stood guard over them. I stayed there until they were released on parole. Then I enlisted in the California Battalion in Captain Brown's Company and went down to meet Fremont at Monterey. We had no trouble until we got to San Juan South. We had twelve Walla Walla Indians along, Captain Burris [Charles Burroughs] in command.
We saw the long glittering lances of the Mexicans as we got into the plain. We were joined about this time by Captain Weaver [Charles M. Weber] and thirty men which gave us about sixty men. The sun was about an hour high when the fight began. We had eight hundred head of horses and four pieces of artillery. We put the horses in the corral at the Gomez ranch and left a dozen men to guard them and took part and fought two hundred Mexicans with fifty men. We formed in line and counted off. Captain Burris [Burroughs] said for No. 1 to fire while No. 2 was to hold his fire, but we soon got mixed up and fired on the Indians who were in advance and fell back, and the Mexicans charged us boldly and we give them the best we had and charged at them. I was close to Burris [Burroughs] when he fell, the captain of the Mexicans killed him, he rode up close to him, and fired, I thought with a pistol. Burris [Burroughs] was killed before we could get him to the rear. We lost a man named Ames and Billy the Cooper of Weaver's [Weber's] Company, and Foster who was a lieutenant. All killed with musket balls or pistols.
After the charge we held the ground. We thought we killed ten of the Mexicans; they retreated. We went to Gomez's house and got two men to go to Monterey and tell Fremont we were there--they got in safely and told Fremont. We buried our dead, when Fremont came up with three hundred men and we all then went to the Mission of San Juan and encamped. Most of us were enlisted into Captain Ford's Company. [We stayed] at San Juan three or four weeks, then started for the lower country with Fremont. I think he was a confounded scamp and a coward.
We crossed the Santa Inez Mountain on Christmas day in a dreadful storm, lost fifteen head of horses, left cannon on the mountain and went down a trail. We might have gone through Gaviota Pass. One of the most noted things that happened was just before we got to San Luis Obispo on the Salmon. We captured an Indian with dispatches, shot him and went on to San Luis Obispo and caught Pico, caught him in bed, surrounded the house and took him down to San Luis Obispo that night and tried him by court martial. [He was] found guilty of violating his parole and sentenced to be shot. We thought he would be shot. We were marshaled out and Fremont released him on the condition that he would stay with and pilot us over the mountains. His family came and begged for him. The boys thought it was a shame to kill the Indian and not Pico.
At Santa Barbara we had no trouble. We lived on beef, had no bread. We had with us about 450 men. As we left San Buena Ventura the Mexicans rode up on top of the hill and the next morning we marched out in battle order, artillery in the center. The Mexicans came out and Fremont got scared and ordered us up a hollow. .......... We could not get through and had to come back, and camped on the Santa Anna River [Santa Clara River]. There we had no trouble until we got to Los Angeles--and had none there.
I came up by land to San Francisco in the spring of 1847 with ten Mexicans. We were given ten dollars apiece and indebted to Major Reading for this. We came up by the coast. All shipped at Santa Clara and I went on to San Francisco and gave up my horse. I was in San Francisco without money, and I had to buy clothes from a sailor. I was standing on Black's Point.  1st Lieutenant Revere  came up and asked me what man-of-war I belonged to. I told him I did not belong to any. He asked me if I had no coat. I told him "No" and showed him my papers. He told me to come the next day and he would give me a coat, which he did. I had nothing to eat and asked him if he could not give me an order to get something. He said that he had nothing, but to come tomorrow and see Captain Dupont. The next day I met Captain Dupont and asked him to give me something to eat until I could get to Sacramento. I lived in San Francisco three months and crossed to Sonoma with J. P. Leese in the sloop Amelia and from there to Sacramento. The officers gave me a horse at Sonoma and I went to Sacramento City.
I paid in work to Captain Sutter for my wifes relations [rations?] while I was gone, and I never got but ten dollars for my services and a 120-acre land warrant; this was the summer of 1847. Myself and a man named Lenox helped to get out the large mill stones for Captain Sutter's grist mill on the American River,  then we made a contract to do the blacksmithing for Sutter and Marshall who were partners in building a saw mill at Colusa [Coloma] where gold was discovered. Up to this time I had not heard of gold. Where I first worked with the whipsaw was afterwards all worked out for gold. My wife was to cook for one or two men. I was to work for three years, to be paid in cattle. The morning we were to start for Colusa [Coloma] from Sutter's Fort, Marshall came into the Fort with a little vial of about an ounce, greenish glass, which was over half full of scale gold. I looked at it and this was the first gold seen in the country. That vial was sent to Capt. [Joseph L.] Folsom in San Francisco, and in six weeks there came back word it was gold of fine quality. It was sent down on the old launch.
I think Major McKinstry took it down, a cousin of Judge [E. W.] McKinstry.
I went up to the mill with my wife and went to work. There were a number of men there, five or six white men. I recollect Weaver and his family, Marshall, Humphreys and Charles Bennett (he died in Oregon), two Mormon teamsters and perhaps a dozen Indians. In the daytime the Indians would dig in the race, which was twenty feet deep in some places and an average of ten feet. At night we would turn the water in and shut it off in the morning, and we would find the gold in the crevices of the rock. It was all scale gold in that race. I went up there just after New Year's Day 1848. It was in the race every morning, we did not pay much attention to it. We picked it up off and on for six weeks without any excitement. A letter came to Marshall from Sutter [reporting] that it was gold of a fine quality. Marshall was then living with me. We had salt salmon and boiled wheat, and we, the discoverers of gold, were living on that when gold was found, and we suffered from scurvy afterwards.
Myself, Marshall, Humphries, and Bennett were living together in a double cabin. Soon as we got word it was gold I said to Marshall: "Let us go up the river, the south fork of the American River, and see if we can't find some gold." We had a pick and pan. We went up the river three miles to a bar and called it Live Oak Bar. We went out on the bar and picked out lump gold of the size of a bean with our fingers, without digging--in all a pint cupful. I said,"This lets up our contract. Now," says I, "James, suppose we divide this gold." "No," says he, "I don't divide. You are a hired man." I said, "That ends our contract." The next day I went back and dug and took out a good deal for myself. It was the first prospecting done.
The people flocked in after that, and I got sick and had to come to Sonoma. I brought down about $3,000 in the fall of 1848. I went back in 1849, in the spring, and worked three months and came back. While in the mines we found a man deserted, on the middle fork of the Feather River. He had chronic diarrhea. Mills visited him. At last one morning he was found dead. He had written on a tin plate, "Deserted by my friends, but not by my God." My partner was named Mills--perhaps it was D. O. Mills  --he and me were working together. Some young fellows came into Spanish Bar where we were, from Napa, and they had one hundred pounds of flour to sell. I told Mills we had better buy it. We gave an ounce for it and found some nice butter rolled up in the center.
We left with eight hundred dollars and came back to Sonoma in the fall of 1849 and have been here ever since. I bought land of Captain Cooper. I have a daughter who is now Mrs. Robert Reid of San Luis Obispo, who was born at Sutter's Fort, September 15, 1846. She was the first white child born in the Sacramento Valley.

===============================================================
I want to add a few more words about my Pioneer ancestors. My Mother Eliza J. (Gregson) Butler was a daughter of James and Eliza Gregson who were born in England. They came to the U.S.A. to Pennsylvania where they later left the Eastern State by wagon train and settled in California, first at Sutters Fort, Sacramento before gold was discovered.
James Gregson was a blacksmith at the Fort, and his anvil is located there now. He was with Marshall when gold was discovered at Coloma. Also he was with Fremont when War broke out with Mexico, and was at Sonoma when the Bear Flag was raised there.
Their first child Ann (Gregson) Reid was born at Sutter's Fort. Afterwards they moved to a ranch in Green Valley (near Graton), Sonoma County. My Mother was born there May 31st, 1854. She had three brothers and 5 sisters.

=========================================================
Author: Alley, Bowen & Co. (1880)
Gregson, James. A representative man of Sonoma county, and  hose portrait is in this history; was born in Little Bolton, Lancashire, England, September 14, 1822. When nearly twelve years old, he  with his parents, emigrated to the United
States, settling in Philadelphia, where, in 1837, James was bound to James
Brooks as an apprentice to the blacksmith and machinists' trade, serving till
twenty-one years of age. Here, on October 20, 1843, he married Miss Eliza
Marshall, who was born in the city of Manchester, England, on March 15, 1824.
They moved to Rock Island county, Illinois, in 1844, sojourning there until
April, 1845; then, in company with Mrs. Gregson's two brothers, Henry and John
Marshall, her sister, Mary A., and mother, Mrs. Ann Marshall, crossed the plains
with ox teams to California. While on the road, and passing through Humboldt
canon, they were attacked by Indians, who killed all their stock, except one
yoke of cattle, which compelled our little party to make a two-wheeled vehicle
out of their wagon, on which their baggage was transported, together with those
persons who were unable to walk. All the men, also Mrs. Gregson and her mother,
traveled on foot the entire distance from Humboldt to Johnston's ranch on Bear
creek, the party arriving there on October 20, 1845. Mr. Marshall did not walk
over twenty miles. The hardships and sufferings which these two women endured on
this journey can better be imagined by those who have passed through a like
experience than described by us. All honor to these ladies, who braved all the
dangers of an overland trip to this State, and at a time when few had dared to
make the journey in order to become permanent settlers, and who have lived to
see the then wilderness of California subdued to a garden of beauty. Mr. Gregson
at once proceeded to Sutter's Fort, where he was employed by Captain John A.
Sutter to work at blacksmithing. During his stay here he enlisted in a company,
to join General Fremont at Monterey, taking with them a drove of horses. In
1846, while at the fort, Mr. Gregson was guard over General Vallejo, who was at
that time a prisoner of the Bear Flag party. He was also engaged in a battle at
Salinas, and followed the movements of Fremont to Los Angeles, when he, together
with other members of his company, were honorably discharged; after which, Mr.
Gregson returned to Sutter's Fort, where he remained till February, 1848, when
he was sent by Captain Sutter to Coloma to assist in erecting the mill which
that gentleman was building at that place. It was while the subject of this
sketch was working on the mill that gold was discovered. Mrs. Gregson has now a
small nugget of the precious metal, which was given her by some Indians in
exchange for a shirt. While this family were residents of Sutter's Fort, their
daughter Anna was born on September 3, 1846. After their arrival in Coloma, the
Indians would come a distance of forty miles to see the baby, and could not be
induced to believe it a real child until they had pinched it, or in some other
way made it cry. In October, 1848, Mr. Gregson came to Sonoma, having moved
there partly to regain his health, which had become impaired while living at
Coloma, but, on recovering which, he returned to Coloma in 1849; thence to the
middle fork of the American river, but was again compelled to leave the mines on
account of ill-health; going to Sacramento, there engaging in house-building in
Sutterville, which he continued till late in the Fall of 1849; thence to Sonoma,
and in January, 1850, settled on his present farm of one hundred and sixty
acres, situated in Green Valley, Analy township, and was the first to break land
and raise grain in the valley. We will here note that Mrs. Gregson's mother and
sisters settled in Sonoma in 1846. No man in this State is more respected than
Mr. Gregson, and his name is everywhere the synonym of probity, honor and
business integrity. Uniting to the frankness and generosity of an Englshman
[sic] the intelligence and polish of the highest type of a gentleman, his name
and pioneer career will ever be associated with all that is most agreeable in
the early settlement of Sonoma county. The names and births of his children are
as follows: Annie, the first white child born in Sutter's Fort, as above. She is
now Mrs. Reid of San Luis Obispo county, this State; Mary Ellen born at Coloma,
September 25, 1848, now Mrs. McChristian; William F., a resident of Stanislaus
county, California, born September 24, 1850; John N., born September 1, 1852,
and resides in San Luis Obispo county; Eliza Jane, now Mrs. Butler, of Mark
West, born May 31, 1854; Henry M., born October 5, 1856; Adelia J., born March
28, 1858, now Mrs. George Fraits, of San Luis Obispo county ; Caroline, born
October 29, 1862, and Luke B., born March 27, 1868.

Additional Comments:
Analy Township

Extracted from:

HISTORY
—OF-
SONOMA COUNTY,
-INCLUDING ITS—
Geology, Topooraphy, Mountains, Valleys and Streams;
—TOGETHER WITH—
A Full and Particular Record of the Spanish Grants; Its Early History and
Settlement, Compiled from the Most Authentic Sources; the Names of Original
Spanish and American Pioneers; a full Political History, Comprising the Tabular
Statements of Elections and Office-holders since the Formation of the County;
Separate Histories of each Township, Showing the Advancement of Grape and Grain
Growing Interests, and Pisciculture;
ALSO, INCIDENTS OF PIONEER LIFE; THE RAISING OF THE BEAR FLAG; AND BIOGRAPHICAL
SKETCHES OF EARLY AND PROMINENT SETTLERS AND REPRESENTATIVE MEN;
—AND OF ITS—
Cities, Towns, Churches, Schools, Secret Societies, Etc., Etc.
ILLUSTRATED.
SAN FRANCISCO:
ALLEY, BOWEN & CO., PUBLISHERS.
1880.
================================================================



================================================================

Eliza & James Gregson's Memories



==================================================

I want to add a few more words about my Pioneer ancestors. My Mother Eliza J. (Gregson) Butler was a daughter of James and Eliza Gregson who were born in England. They came to the U.S.A. to Pennsylvania where they later left the Eastern State by wagon train and settled in California, first at Sutters Fort, Sacramento before gold was discovered.
James Gregson was a blacksmith at the Fort, and his anvil is located there now. He was with Marshall when gold was discovered at Coloma. Also he was with Fremont when War broke out with Mexico, and was at Sonoma when the Bear Flag was raised there.
Their first child Ann (Gregson) Reid was born at Sutter's Fort. Afterwards they moved to a ranch in Green Valley (near Graton), Sonoma County. My Mother was born there May 31st, 1854. She had three brothers and 5 sisters.
Memoirs of Lavina Pearl Butler Robbins-granddaughter
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Generation No. 1

1.  JAMES24 GREGSON (NICHOLAS23, JOHN22, WILLIAM21, JOHN20, JOHN19, THOMAS18, MATHIAS17, JOHIS16, RICHARD15, JOHN14, WILLIAM13, WILLIAM12, THOMAS11, JOHN10, THOMAS9 GREGSONNE, GEORGE8, ARTHUR7 GREGORYSONNE, GREGORY6 DE NORMANTON, ARTHUR5, GEORGE4, ARTHURE3, JOHN2, 1) was born September 14, 1822 in Little Bolton, Lancashire, England, and died August 02, 1899 in Green Valley, Graton, Sonoma Co. CA.  He married ELIZA JANE MARSHALL October 20, 1843 in Pawtucket, RI, daughter of John Marshall and Anna Hughes.

 Children of James Gregson and Eliza Marshall are: 
 i. NICHOLAS25 GREGSON, b. September 26, 1844, Rock Island County, Illinois; d. December 1844, Rock Island County, Illinois. 
2. ii. ANN ELIZABETH GREGSON, b. September 03, 1846, Sutters Fort, Sacramento, California; d. May 31, 1926, San Jose, California??. 
 iii. MARY ELLEN GREGSON, b. September 25, 1848, Coloma, CA; d. March 26, 1928; m. (1) UNKNOWN PERSON; m. (2) SYLVESTER MCCHRISTIAN, November 01, 1870. 
3. iv. WILLIAM F. GREGSON, b. September 24, 1850, Green Valley, Graton, Sonoma Co. California; d. December 02, 1926, Stockton, San Joquin Co. California. 
4. v. JOHN NICHOLAS GREGSON, b. September 01, 1852, Green Valley, Sonoma County, California; d. February 18, 1925, Sonoma County, California. 
5. vi. ELIZA JANE GREGSON, b. May 31, 1854, Sonoma County, California; d. May 24, 1948. 
6. vii. HENRY MARMADUKE GREGSON, b. October 05, 1856, Green Valley, Graton, Sonoma Co. California; d. June 05, 1915, Red Bluff, Tehama Co. CA. 
 viii. ADELIA ISABELLA J. GREGSON, b. March 28, 1858; m. (1) GEORGE A. (FRUITS) FRAITS, February 15, 1877; m. (2) PETER S. BAKER, May 18, 1884. 
7. ix. CAROLINE GREGSON, b. October 29, 1862, Green Valley, Sonoma County, California; d. March 18, 1938. 

8. x. LUKE BOWLES GREGSON, b. March 27, 1868, Green Valley, Graton, Sonoma Co. CA; d. October 01, 1946, Santa Rosa. Sonoma Co. California. 
http://www.cis-co.com/gregson/

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The San Francisco Call
(San Francisco, California)

23 Jan 1898, Sun  • Page 12